Inspiring Quotations

The value of an extensive experience with living form for the cultivation of the soul…

“The accelerated development of biological research in the direction of genetic engineering, that investigates the visible realm in order to achieve mastery over the processes of nature – this unavoidable development will result in a horrifying impoverishment of our relationship to nature if we do not begin immediately to take to heart the value of … Continue reading

Pelargonium sidoides – more than just a medicine for upper respiratory problems?
Doctrine of Signatures / Medicinal Uses

Pelargonium sidoides – more than just a medicine for upper respiratory problems?

Pelargonium sidoides DC. Geraniaceae (Cranesbill or Storksbill Family) Kalwerbossie. Rabassam. “Umckaloabo”. This plant has a basal rosette of more-or-less heart-shaped greyish green leaves that are gently hairy. It produces small sweet-scented typical Pelargonium-shaped flowers that are unusually dark purple, almost blackish in colour. The plant produces elongated, swollen roots that are reddish-brown internally. Herbal medicines are … Continue reading

Polygala myrtifolia
Doctrine of Signatures / Medicinal Uses

Polygala myrtifolia

  Polygala myrtifolia “myrtle-leaved muchmilk” September bush (Eng.); Augustusbossie, blouertjie, langelede (Afr.) Polygalaceae – the milkwort family This beautiful pink butterfly-flowered plant opens the senses and causes awareness of the physical body. It goes to the hands, wrists and feet and to the metacarpophalangeal joints of the great toes, in particular. It has potential as … Continue reading

Seriphium plumosum “Slangbos”: an ill-fitting name for a tough but graceful plant
Doctrine of Signatures / Medicinal Uses

Seriphium plumosum “Slangbos”: an ill-fitting name for a tough but graceful plant

Seriphium plumosum (syn. Stoebe plumosa) Asteraceae Snake Bush, Grey Bush. Khoi Bedding Plant. Names not really suited to this interesting member of the  Daisy Family, although its Latin binomial is slightly better “feathery serif” is closer to the mark. “The origin of the word serif is obscure, but apparently almost as recent as the type style. In The … Continue reading